2011 Archive

  • December 21, 2011

    In collaboration with fellow Clinton Global Initiative Haiti Action Network member Architecture for Humanity, International Action has installed the first clean water system for the Southeast water project at École La Dignité, a primary school in the town of Cayes-Jacmel. École La Dignité, headed by Mrs. Vivianne Vieux, is the only free private school in Jacmel.

  • November 9, 2011

    Water is essential to our survival. Imagine being without it or having to walk hours to have access to the most vital commodity that we need to go about our daily activities. — Madame Nicole Defay, Director of Williamson Village in Haiti

  • October 26, 2011

    A year after the cholera outbreak, the infection has sickened close to half a million Haitians, and experts fear that the number of dead may reach 10,000 by the end of the year. It is, says Paul Farmer of Partners in Health, "far and away the biggest epidemic in the world right now."

  • October 24, 2011

    Does your organization work with children in Haiti? If so, help us fight malnutrition and dysentery, and boost school attendance, by distributing albendazole de-worming pills.

    We have a supply of albendazole de-worming pills ready for distribution from our warehouse in Port-au-Prince. If your group works with a school or clinic in Haiti, why not partner with us to combat this scourge? Complete our Albendazole Request Form.

  • October 13, 2011

    By providing potable water to disadvantaged neighborhoods in Haiti, we expected that the residents’ lives would improve. They did, however an unlikely and unfortunate consequence presented itself; if people needed to collect water at night, how would they do so safely? There have long been reports of armed robbery and sexual assault (as people in Haiti call “kadejak”) at communal water stations.

  • October 11, 2011
    Children and Missions of Love staff at the Good Shepard OrphanageChildren and Missions of Love staff at the Good Shepard Orphanage

    The percentage of Haitian people currently infected with worms is staggering; nearly 80% of Haiti’s 9.7 million people have some form of intestinal worms. These parasites are especially threatening to children who are malnourished already; intestinal worms can consume up to 20% of a child’s daily intake. Being infected can lead to dysentery, stunted growth, learning disabilities, and habitual fatigue.

  • October 3, 2011
    Mercy School students in classroomMercy School students in classroom

    Believe it or not, even in the second decade of the 21st century, only 52% of Haitians between 15 and 24 years of age are literate. Haiti also faces a shortage of education supplies, severely hindering young Haitians’ chances of building a better future for themselves and their country.

  • October 3, 2011

    Since October 2010, the death toll from cholera has reached 6,435. The Haitian Health Ministry places the number of people infected just under 500,000. The mode of transport of cholera from person to person is unclean water; other illnesses profit from untreated water, such as chronic diarrhea, hepatitis, and typhoid fever.

  • September 19, 2011

    Back to School! For students starting the new school year at Collège Chrétien Emmanuel, Ecole Nationale de Thozin, and Collège Vision Moderne, back to school supplies include: paper? (check)—pencils? (check)—uniform? (check)—and clean water? CHECK!

    In July of this year, we installed clean water systems at these three schools, ensuring the 2,193 students would have access to clean, safe water for the upcoming 2011-2012 school year.

  • August 17, 2011

    One of the displaced-persons camps in Port-au-Prince, called Martissant 2A, has developed into a sprawling shantytown of 35,000 people and also gained the nickname “the lawless zone,” due to how under-served its residents are. In July of 2011, DINEPA (the Haitian government’s water agency) undertook the responsibility of building five water stations around the area, with the aid of the International Organization for Migration and the International Red Cross.

  • July 22, 2011

    Eric Harshfield and Shivani Jain, two graduate students from the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University, are providing a six-week evaluation of International Action's flagship program – Campaign for Clean Water in Haiti. This is our community-based chlorinator and water storage tank program. The primary custodians of this project are the community leaders and members, who have an invaluable role in every step of the process.

  • June 24, 2011

    Thanks to International Action, Institution Vision pour le Developement de Delmas has a 2,000-gallon tank and chlorinator. There was no clean water in this neighborhood. Now there is. Residents have reported that 16,000 people are benefiting, but more tanks are needed.

  • June 24, 2011

    The mayor of Delmas' compound – also known as the "Palace of Delmas" – contacted International Action, because they needed clean water. We installed a 2,000-gallon tank and two chlorinators. This tank provides safe water for employees and communities that work with the mayor. Government officials and the president are among those who make appearances at the compound. 

  • June 24, 2011

    To further the "return home" goal, International Action installed two chlorinators in the neighborhood of Cité-aux-Cayes while DINEPA has worked to restore water there. Also, a school with over 200 students in Cité Soleil received a 150-gallon water tank. 

  • June 24, 2011

    International Action is working with the CICR (Red Cross) to return clean water to the slums in Port-au-Prince. Our role in this partnership is to disinfect the water. The project is being realized in the neighborhood of Drouillard, a commune of Cité Soleil. 

  • June 24, 2011

    International Action installed a 2000-gallon water tank and chlorinator at the Community Center of the Haitian-American Caucus in the commune of Croix-des-Bouquets. Students, professors, and the community of Michauad will now have access to clean water. The goal of the school is to "foster sustainable changes in the Haitian community through volunteerism, community service, social programs, and partnerships with other organization with similar goals." 

  • June 24, 2011

    International Action and Action Against Hunger have partnered to reestablish water infrastructure in the poorest neighborhoods in Port-au-Prince. Mont Jolie is one of these communities. Some 2,000 people call Mont Jolie home, but nearly 30,000 come to this neighborhood to get clean water. 

  • June 20, 2011

    International Action’s Haiti office is distributing 500,000 albendazole de-worming pills to protect Haiti’s communities and get its children healthy and back in school. The pills are available free of charge to non-profit or community organizations that can administer them.

  • June 14, 2011

    Cholera resurgence is heavily hitting the community of Carrefour. Our team will focus its efforts in that zone to bring a solid response. We will work with the local community such as the mayor, delegates, and water board leaders.

  • June 8, 2011

    Day after day in May it rained in Port-au-Prince. Wesley Laîné reported to us,

    Children were huddled up under blue tarps and tents, praying, hoping that the rain would stop. It does not.

    This morning, gutters, and sewers are overflowing with rainwater mixed with mud and trash. For many, it will be their only source of drinking water. Some will bathe in it. Others will use it to cook. The end result will be the same, more waterborne illnesses and more deaths.

  • June 8, 2011

    In April, Dalebrun Esther sent us a list of new major installations with 2000-gallon tanks. This most recent report from Dalebrun Esther – our Haitian director – lists the following new chlorinator installations:

  • June 8, 2011

    International Action installed a 2,000-gallon water storage tank at a maternal clinic in the Boston section of Cité Soleil, the most impoverished town in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Our water tank will supply patients at the clinic as well as local residents with clean drinking water. According to the head of the clinic, more than 7,000 people live in the neighborhood. Shelly Chvotzkin – an employee at the clinic – has stated, "This will help us to better care for our patients and have a bigger impact on their lives as well as help us save lives!"

  • June 8, 2011

    International Action installed a 2000-gallon water tank to provide clean drinking water to an orphanage, school, and church in Lison. The community had no drinking water infrastructure. Our recently installed chlorinator and water tank will disinfect drinking water for children at the aforementioned institutions and more than 400 residents in the neighborhood.

  • June 8, 2011

    The local leaders of Rosenberg contacted International Action and requested for help. Previously, residents with enough resources purchased water from a privately owned water kiosk at 7 gourdes (US 17 cents) per gallon. The poor gathered any water they could from wells with untreated water. Upon the leaders’ request International Action installed a 2000-gallon water and a chlorinator, which will provide clean drinking water to the residents of Rosenberg.

  • June 8, 2011

    First I would like to thank International Action for the positive work they are doing in my country, Haiti. Thank you for targeting the issues at their root by trying to eliminate the problem, not just dealing with the negative outcomes. The purpose of my email is to inform International Action that I will be having a medical mission in Carrefour, Haiti at the College Elie Blaise starting Saturday, June 25. During the mission we will offer complete physical examination, screening (diabetes & blood pressure), eye exams, patient education to raise awareness, screening and treatment for malnutrition, acid reflux, wound care and much more.

  • June 7, 2011

    Bertin is the biggest slum in the town of Carrefour and is located 5 miles west of the center of Port-au-Prince. The neighborhood is very poor and ill-serviced and has an estimated population of over 400,000 people. International Action installed 10 chlorinators between 2006 and 2007 and has been working with local water board members to maintain chlorinators and distribute de-worming pills.

  • June 7, 2011

    International Action has installed several chlorinators to provide clean, safe drinking water to the town of Croix-des-Bouquets, a northern suburb in the Port-au-Prince metropolitan area. The number of locations with access to clean water continues to expand.  The newest on that list is the LOCC Mission orphanage.

  • June 7, 2011

    International Action installed a 150-gallon water tank to provide more water storage for the Delmas Commercial Center, formerly known as the National Television of Haiti building. Delmas has much of the capital’s commercial and industrial enterprises. The Commercial Center has more than 400 shopkeepers. None of them had access to water or sanitation before the presence of our 150-gallon water tank and chlorinator that is now providing safe, clean drinking water to the shopkeepers. Our Chlorine test after the installation shows that there are no more waterborne disease-causing bacteria.

  • May 28, 2011

    The ARCHIVE institute is an organization that builds housing in order to improve the overall health of the people served. They recently contacted us, because they need assistance fitting one of their newer projects with the physical infrastructure necessary for safe drinking water. This project aims to help two small housing projects as well as an orphanage. The housing project is specifically designed for people living with HIV/AIDS.

  • May 27, 2011

    Doug Frye, an assistant minister at the Rio Revolution Church, recently contacted International Action because of our water treatment expertise. This church creates prison ministries and maintains an orphanage in Haiti. Upon their last visit to the Mirbalais prison, it became apparent to them that the standard of water quality in the prison was atrocious, causing widespread disease in the inmate population.

  • May 26, 2011

    The Communities in Schools Dallas Region (CISDR) is a stay-in-school program, founded in 1985. CISDR partnered with the Exxon Mobil program Girls Exploring Math and Science. The two groups will participate in the 2010 TEDxKids event. One of the goals of the event was to have the participating students complete a service learning project. These students chose to support the Haitian De-Worming project because they felt they could make a positive impact in the lives of many Haitians. They rallied together and created a penny drive in order to purchase and ship albendazole tablets to Haiti. Their tagline was simple: one penny is enough to rid one person of debilitating intestinal worms. There campaign was so successful, that they raised $1816.29!

  • May 25, 2011

    In the midst of preparing many IDP camps for the rainy season in Haiti, International Action was contacted by a NGO working directly will internally displaced person camps in Carrefour. Action Humanitaire is an organization helping the residents of Camp Wouj Tapis, an IDP camp with 13,000 residents that lack access to safe water and food.

  • May 25, 2011

    Recently, International Action was contacted by an organization called Join the Journey, a Christian humanitarian organization, regarding the situation in the tent city of Capvva. This IDP (Internally Displaced Persons) camp located near Cité Soleil in the northeast corner of Port-au-Prince, is full of Haitians still displaced from the January 2010 Earthquake that ravaged the country.

  • May 17, 2011

    Early this morning a homeless Haitian boy kneeled by an open drainage ditch to clean himself up. Due to the increased rainfall experienced during the rainy season, the drainage ditch is at the brink of overflow, allowing this boy to wash his hands and face with its waters. This water is contaminated.

  • April 29, 2011

    In the midst of numerous water projects in Port-au-Prince and provincial towns in Haiti, International Action was made aware of the Haiti Clinic’s dire water situation. There simply was no water. Haiti Clinic, located in Cité Soleil, is a maternal clinic that provides free healthcare to the neighborhood residents. The clinic was in dire need of clean water to meet the needs of its patients and staff. Its patients, mostly comprised of pregnant women and children, were going thirsty during their visits to the clinic.

  • April 28, 2011

    Please take a look at the first photos of our first water delivery in the schools. This particular schools is situated in the largest IDP (Internally Displace Person) camp in Corail, Haiti. There are 136 students, 6 professors, 10 staffers. Most of the children are orphans from the January 2010 earthquake.

  • April 19, 2011

    International Action is excited to introduce our newest campaign in Haiti. The Campaign for Clean Water for Schools aims to bring clean water to all students enrolled in schools in Cité Soleil, one of the poorest slums in the capital of Port-Au- Prince. The goal of the campaign is clear: bring clean water to students so that they may focus on their education rather than be debilitated by stomach aches and diarrhea caused by dirty, bacteria ridden water. By focusing on their education, they can rise up and overcome the cycle of poverty that they currently exist in.

  • March 23, 2011
    DINEPA official checks out IA water tank and chlorinator

    DINEPA official checks out IA tank and chlorinator

    The National Directorate of Water Supply and Sanitation (DINEPA), in collaboration with the United Nation’s Children Fund (UNICEF), invited International Action and other non-profit entities in Haiti to participate in an exhibition and panel discussion to commemorate World Water Day 2011. The event dedicated to water challenges in Haiti, featured International Action’s water tank and chlorinator and its dedication to make clean water a reality for the most impoverished people in Haiti.

  • March 19, 2011

    In response to the growing demands for clean water from the internally displaced people living in camps throughout Port-au-Prince, International Action has launched a new initiative to fulfill the urgent requests for intervention. We purchased a new water truck, 1,000-gallon capacity, which will serve several camps, clinics, and schools in the metropolitan Port-au-Prince area.

  • February 16, 2011

    Having grown up in Haiti, I understand the acute dangers of living without clean water. I remember vividly the small worms that we had to remove by hand in the water buckets in our house. The frequent trips to the local clinic were a constant reminder that each sip of water was a risk. As a result, ensuring that water is safe, secure, and sustainable for my younger Haitian brothers and sisters has always been a personal and professional priority. International Action has granted me the opportunity to do just that.